A description of matthew arnolds poem dover beach

Allott has Arnold in Dover in June and again in October of that year "on his return from his delayed continental honeymoon". In the musical Cabaretthe American aspiring novelist Cliff Bradshaw recites parts of the poem to the singer Sally Bowles because being English she wants to hear proper English after having been in Berlin for some time.

In reality, Arnold is expressing that nothing is certain, because where there is light there is dark and where there is happiness there is sadness. Inafter a short interlude of teaching at Rugby, he was elected Fellow of Oriel CollegeOxford.

Second Series would not appear until Novembershortly after his untimely death. Inhe won an open scholarship to Balliol CollegeOxford.

Allott has Arnold in Dover in June and again in October of that year "on his return from his delayed continental honeymoon". Sophocles long ago Heard it on the Aegean, and it brought Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow Of human misery; we Find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

As for the metrical scheme, there is no apparent rhyme scheme, but rather a free handling of the basic iambic pattern. Culture and Anarchy is also famous for its popularisation of the phrase "sweetness and light," first coined by Jonathan Swift. Arnold is famous for introducing a methodology of literary criticism somewhere between the historicist approach common to many critics at the time and the personal essay; he often moved quickly and easily from literary subjects to political and social issues.

He considered the most important criteria used to judge the value of a poem were "high truth" and "high seriousness".

In the first stanza, Arnold displays an outwardly beautiful nightly seaside scenery, when the lyrical self calls his love to the window "Come. As with Tennyson, Hopkins, and Rossetti, Arnold's dominant precursor was Keatsbut this is an unhappy puzzle, since Arnold unlike the others professed not to admire Keats greatly, while writing his own elegiac poems in a diction, meter, imagistic procedure, that are embarrassingly close to Keats.

All these are basic human values. By this standard, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales did not merit Arnold's approval.

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His poem, " Dover Beach ," depicted a nightmarish world from which the old religious verities have receded. And naked shingles of the world.

Dover Beach Analysis

To critics who conclude that ll. The repetition of "is" in lines is used to illustrate the nightly seaside scenery: Arnold probably mentions him not just because he wrote tragedies but because he was pre-Christian, living in the fifth century BCE, over years before Christ.

Critics have varied in their interpretation of the first two lines; one calls them a "perfunctory gesture Matthew Arnold uses the means of 'pathetic fallacy', when he attributes or rather projects the human feeling of sadness onto an inanimate object like the sea.

Thomas Arnold, he rejected the supernatural elements in religion, even while retaining a fascination for church rituals.

Matthew Arnold’s Dover Beach: Summary & Analysis

The first fourteen lines may well also suggest a sonnet, since this gives certain appearances that it is a love poem. The verse-movement, with its fluid alternation of three, four and five-beat lines, suggests the rhythmic flexibility of Greek choral poetry. Sophocles long ago Heard it on the Aegean, and it brought Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow Of human misery; we Find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

University of London Press Ltd, My poems represent, on the whole, the main movement of mind of the last quarter of a century, and thus they will probably have their day as people become conscious to themselves of what that movement of mind is, and interested in the literary productions which reflect it.

Poem of the week: Dover Beach

Stanza two, with its reference to Sophocles, brings home a sense of tragic fatedness. Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach" Matthew Arnold Biography Arnold, "perhaps the most serious man alive," was a well-known poet as well as a social and literary critic ("Matthew Arnold").

Matthew Arnold’s Dover Beach: Summary This is a poem about a sea and a beach that is truly beautiful, but holds much deeper meaning than what meets the eye. The poem is written in free verse with no particular meter or rhyme scheme, although some of the words do rhyme.

Brief summary of the poem Dover Beach. "Dover Beach" opens with a quiet scene. A couple looks out on the moonlit water of the English Channel, and listens to the sound of the waves. Arguably Matthew Arnold's most famous poem, "Dover Beach" manages to comment on his most recurring themes despite its relatively short length.

Its message - like that of many of his other poems - is that the world's mystery has declined in the face of modernity.

In “Dover Beach,” Matthew Arnold expresses his fear of failing to find meaning in man, nature, and religion. Arnold’s description of the sea and the naturalistic scene around him conveys his.

“Dover Beach” is a dramatic monologue of thirty-seven lines, divided into four unequal sections or “paragraphs” of fourteen, six, eight, and nine lines. In the title, “Beach” is more.

A description of matthew arnolds poem dover beach
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Analysis of "Dover Beach" by Matthew Arnold | Essay Example